Quintuplets

Lambing is going well so far. We have one set of quintuplets, (shown). There is one lamb acting as a pillow for another that can be barely seen behind mom.
We have the one set of quintuplets, three sets of triplets, four sets of twins, and four single lambs for a total of 26 lambs from 12 ewes so far. Only 30 more ewes to lamb out and we are done!!
Moms and babies are doing well but I am helping this mom feed her babies. It would be unfair to expect her to produce enough milk for all five - she has done more than her fair share by delivering all five on her own!
Oh Wendy! No wonder you are so busy! Oh my! This is such a sweet photo.
posted March 19th, 2018  
How eonderful. Do you keep all the lambs to increase your herd, or sell them?
posted March 19th, 2018  
Great capture of mom and her babies.
posted March 19th, 2018  
@henrir
We keep most of the females from the multiple births because prolific is hereditary. All of the boys are sold, and many of the single girls are sold unless they are from a first time mom who was a twin or better.
First time moms will often only deliver single lambs.
They say that one lamb will pay for mom's board for the year, and the second one is profit ... which is why we want twins or better (though five is a little much - lol!!)
posted March 19th, 2018  
oooh! gorgeous captured, my friend!!!
posted March 19th, 2018  
Oh my gosh this is the sweetest photo! I love how the mama is looking at camera! She looks so happy to be there with her babies.
posted March 19th, 2018  
A lovely image
posted March 19th, 2018  
I've never seen a ewe with five lambs before, hasn't she done well. They look good lambs too. Five will keep you busy! Love this photo so a big fave. Hope the rest lamb well & all goes well.
posted March 19th, 2018  
Gorgeous image! Fav!
posted March 19th, 2018  
Aw! I remember you saying you'd be busy with lambing. They've been very prolific. Hope they all are healthy.
posted March 19th, 2018  
5-Wow--are these Finn sheep? Wish I was there - I sure miss lambing season and to see these ewes litter would be fantastic. Do you have to assist many? These would be great milch ewes.
posted March 19th, 2018  
@lanikyea
They are Rideau Arcott - a breed developed right here in Canada at the Agricultural Research Centre Ottawa (hence the name Arcott from the first letters of the centre)
They were bred to be very prolific and maternal so we have very few single lambs (except from the first time moms) with mostly twins and triplets.
They usually lamb on their own although we do get the occasional lamb that needs to be pulled because it is breech or has a leg back. The single lambs tend to be large and will need help sometimes but, that does not happen often with these girls. We ship any girls who give us singles two times running.
They can usually raise triplets on their own with no extra milk from us but obviously five is a little too much to expect from one ewe.
They are a calm and hardy breed that we keep outside all year round except for lambing when we bring them in - mostly because it is so much more convenient for us.
posted March 20th, 2018  
@farmreporter Thanks Wendy for the info. They sound like wonderful sheep. Do they flock together or wander apart when in large pastures? Medium or fine wool? They sound like great dual purpose sheep. Thanks again for the info.
posted March 20th, 2018  
How wonderful. Very proud mum!! Are some of the lambs to be bottle fed?
posted March 20th, 2018  
Wonderful to read your commentary and answers. This looks like an idyllic scene but I guess it is far from it. Much hard work and some heartache along the way I guess. fav
posted March 20th, 2018  
Great capture
posted March 20th, 2018  
What a sweet picture! I enjoyed reading all the comments, questions and your answers. Very interesting! Good luck with the rest of the ewes and newborns - reading this you have just started...
posted March 20th, 2018  
astonishing
posted March 24th, 2018  
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