The Studio Door by grizzlysghost

The Studio Door

Film: Expired 1960, Agfa Isopan F 17/10 DIN
See film here (with WOODEN spool!): http://365project.org/grizzlysghost/365/2011-03-29
Camera: 1952 Rolleiflex 2.8C w/light yellow filter
See camera here: http://365project.org/grizzlysghost/365/2011-05-28
Photo of me at work getting this photo: http://365project.org/grizzlysghost/the-projects/2013-01-10

Day 4 of the One-Night-Stand challenge calls for an architectural shot. Here in the sticks of Northwest Montana, the pickings are slim; but I would have to say one of my favorites is my very own "studio."

Built decades ago by my grandfather from timber on our land, he used no nails or metal hardware at all; just carved logs and wooden dowels; and it's still solid to this day! He also built the doors from scrap cedar siding.

I had a very special roll of film loaded into my Rolleiflex; 12 frames that had to have meaning for me. You see, I only have a few rolls of film this old; expired in 1960, so old they are on wooden spools! I had been carrying it around for days now, looking for a subject; I'm glad I chose the studio!

The second challenge was developing this film. The chemicals are long gone, and techniques scattered and contradictory; so I used my whits, made my own calculations, and dove in; and must say I am very happy with the results and the entire roll!

I shall be posting more frames from this roll in the near future.

For those of you interested, here is a breakdown of the development process:


Developed with 1+1 D76 @20 degrees Celsius for 10 minutes
Gentle agitation first 30 seconds
Three gentle turns every 30 seconds thereafter
Gently agitated in stop bath for 90 seconds.
Fixed with quick-fix for 6 minutes, gently agitated first 30 seconds, then 4 turns every 30 seconds thereafter.
Rinsed continuously for 6 minutes.
Gently agitated in photoflo for 30 seconds.
Hung to dry for 1 hour.

And to see this photo in much better detail (34mb), check it out on my Flickr page:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/16410567@N02/8368373597/in/photostream
Caz
I love the lines and textures and am amazed that this came from 50 year old film ! Wow
January 11th, 2013  
I love the story that goes with this photo, it has such meaning. Beautiful lines, texture and dof.
January 11th, 2013  
Lyn
I remember reading about your grandfather's work on the house early on in your project. This is absolutely lovely and I agree that the detail on Flickr is almost too good!
January 11th, 2013  
What a wonderful photo!!! Really cool you were able to use film from 1960.
January 11th, 2013  
How beautiful that you have this gorgeous studio (lucky bastard) bulit by your grandfather and you can take wonderful photos of it that you develop yourself. I love everything about that:)
January 11th, 2013  
Awesome shot and that film hasn't sufferred any.
January 11th, 2013  
A fabulous door.. and what meaning it must hold for you... love the lines, textures and lighting!
January 11th, 2013  
Such an interesting door. I like the lines. It looks to be in great shape given its age.
January 11th, 2013  
Absolutely brilliant detail - ....and amazing story on the build. What sort of timber did he make it from? (and I'm assuming the "cedar" doors are made from Thuja / Western Red cedar (although our Australian red cedar is pretty spectacular too - Toona ciliata).
January 11th, 2013  
@corymbia The timber is pine, and yes, Western Red cedar :)
January 11th, 2013  
great shot and processing...I remember those days of agitating! love the textures on this for Aaron, nice one mate!
January 11th, 2013  
This reminds me of another world. Am taking plunge after watching video, and have ordered a rollei c41 kit
January 11th, 2013  
Were you close to your grandfather as a youngster? Wonderful story and photo. I will check out the full version on Flickr tomorrow. Made mistake of looking at my phone, I.e, 365, when I awoke from sleep just now and need to get back to my zzzz's. Tmi? Lol ...
January 11th, 2013  
Awesome! I love the story!
January 11th, 2013  
what a great shot for the theme "door"! :)
January 11th, 2013  
Impressive that your grandfather built this himself and with no use of any hardware. You're really fortunate to hang on to this wonderful piece of family history. How big is your plot of land and how long has it been in your family?
January 11th, 2013  
Lovely wood grain and detail in that door :)
January 11th, 2013  
Wow, you appear to have done quite well with its developing. It has some nice toning. The door is beautiful with all its lines.
January 11th, 2013  
Wonderful tone and contrast and light!
January 11th, 2013  
@peterdegraaff Thanks Peter! My C41 kit should get here today (fingers crossed)!
@rockinrobyn Haha, you're addicted to 365 Robyn; no shame in that! :) My grandfather and I were very close, and still are (though he lives in Washington state now). I bought this place from him several years ago, and spent a lot of time here in my youth.
January 11th, 2013  
@lisjam1 He's quite the amazing man! He also paints, carves, tinkers, draws, etc; an inspiration for sure! I sit on 10 wooded acres, which started out as just a bunch of trees. My grandfather and friends cleared an area for the house, laid the foundation, and built it the whole thing, so I would have to say this house has been in my family for as long as it's been a house :)
January 11th, 2013  
Your grandpa sounds wonderful. I was close to my grandparents as I grew up. My grandpa used to pick my sisters and I up and take us to and from school most days, we would spend the night at grandma and grandpa's usually at least once a week, that sort of thing. I now live four hours away from my parents, so my kids don't get to enjoy that same day-in-day-out closeness with their grandparents, which I regret, but they still manage to have a good, genuine relationship. Wow, I'm so glad you bought the homestead to keep it in the family. Beautiful treasure.
January 11th, 2013  
love the sound of Grandpa...lovely shot for him!
January 11th, 2013  
Great lines and textures!!
January 11th, 2013  
amazing, gorgeous. I don't know how you nailed the developing so well. I over agitate I think, were you doing it gently because its old film?
January 11th, 2013  
@chewyteeth I think so; I just felt I needed to treat it with more care; move the solution around, but in a nice way. But I am generally pretty gentle anyway. I will experiment one of these days with some same rolls and develop them differently to see what happens.
January 11th, 2013  
Love your story! My grandparents worked in the logging camps of Northern Ontario and my grandfather built many things like this by hand. That was great workmanship.
January 11th, 2013  
He did beautiful work....love the textures! While I don't understand film processing very well.....I can tell that you nailed the process for this old film!
January 12th, 2013  
@lynnb Thanks Lynn!
January 12th, 2013  
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