The works

...Bluescope Steel, Port Kembla.

Taken with Fuji GSW690II on Kodak TMax100 developed in D76 (1:1) for 9:30 mins at 20C.
This shot makes it look like it is in the wilderness, if only! I grew up a bit north of here. Lovely composition and B&W. I love how you not only capture a moment in time , but do it with such style and developing expertise. Wonderful.
posted February 1st, 2013  
Nicely shot, Peter.
posted February 1st, 2013  
Are you doing all of your own developing now? Interesting subject!
posted February 1st, 2013  
bep
Looks very impressive!
posted February 1st, 2013  
Beautiful
posted February 1st, 2013  
It looks very remote and windswept. Nicely captured.
posted February 1st, 2013  
such beautiful detail of the landscape, especially the shrubs and grass. Very inspiring!
posted February 1st, 2013  
Nice
posted February 1st, 2013  
Great detail, interesting industrial landscape
posted February 1st, 2013  
This is awesome, Peter! I would love to watch you do your magic in the dark room and learn from a master! Hmmm, that sounds a little funny but you know what I mean! :o)
posted February 1st, 2013  
@orangecrush I am hardly a master, but thank you for the praise
posted February 1st, 2013  
Nice industrial shot.
posted February 1st, 2013  
Sue
Love your composition Peter & the fact it's b&w. Rural vs industrial!
posted February 1st, 2013  
Great composition!
posted February 2nd, 2013  
you have stunning photos!
posted February 2nd, 2013  
Nice shot!! I like how you composed it.
posted February 2nd, 2013  
How to make an eyesore look great. Well done
posted February 2nd, 2013  
In the '80s when I shot 35 mm with my Pentax ME-F and later a Minolta, I liked to use that film when I shot B&W. Wonderful! For color I always preferred Fuji to Kodak because the Fuji gave those very nice European pastels. (Sadly that changed when they followed Kodak's lead and brightened everything to an unreasonable, unrealistic, degree.) I'll tell you the honest truth. I don't miss film. Digital is SO inexpensive; shoot thousands of photos to get one good one just like the National Geographic folks do with their unlimited film supplies. LOL AND, the technology is advancing SO quickly that my little Canon does stuff you would have had to pay thousands of bucks for in the film heyday. Plus, with the digital editing software I've got I can do just about anything, you know? And it's available to EVERYBODY.

I know very well that there are, and will always be, devotees of film who would rather fight than switch. LOL That's OK. I know vinyl records are popular again too. lol

I have a friend who has probably never bought a CD in his life even now. Bob Norton is one of those audiophiles who swears tube amps are "warmer" than transistor ones. lol

Ron
posted February 2nd, 2013  
Diggin all these film images. Thanks for sharing the details!
posted February 2nd, 2013  
You obviously have a place that can be kept at 20degC! Do you have a couch in there too!
posted February 2nd, 2013  
@maggiemae I use a bit of ice
posted February 2nd, 2013  
@rolando115 I was an early adopter of digital going back to the first Apple camera. I have several digital cameras and choose to use them when I want. Similarly i use film and develop it because I want to. Film and digital are quite different media. Film does things that digital cannot. Large format photography is far more detailed and expressive than digital can yet hope to be, largely because of the size and cost of sensors. Medium format photography is incredibly expensive and elitist compared to film. I am not sure why you would think using film is resistance. There are more important things to resist like global warming. Sure you can go and take hundreds of digital photos and never look at them again or they can be lost in updates. A few years ago it was floppy disks, then CDs and now memory sticks. Film is tangible, exists in reality, and can be lost and found. cf http://365project.org/peterdegraaff/365/2013-01-26

Using film teaches the photographer to be selective and how to use a camera to its fullest potential. this translates to digital as well.
posted February 2nd, 2013  
It's a lovely shot Peter.
posted February 2nd, 2013  
This is great!!
posted February 2nd, 2013  
@rolando115 @peterdegraaff Great b&w tones, composition, contrast and composition, Peter. Really nice film work. Ron, I shot film from the mid 60's until 2003. Switched to digital and have not shot a roll of film since. However, film has an analog depth to it that digital can not match. Those of us who are still shooting film have my highest admiration. As far as music, the same thing. Vinyl, when played on super high end equipment with tube amplifiers, sounds worlds better than highly compressed MP3 files. My son is 23 and he and his friends are big vinyl fans.
posted February 2nd, 2013  
Great shot Peter - just realised l wasn't following you...am now!!
posted February 2nd, 2013  
cool capture
posted February 3rd, 2013  
Cool. I do believe you've time travelled back to the 70s. That would be good -would give more time to solve climate change.
posted February 3rd, 2013  
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