medlar on the tree by quietpurplehaze

medlar on the tree

In case you have not heard of medlars:

"The uniqueness of the fruit comes is that it must be nearly rotten to be edible.

The process of "ripening" the fruit is referred to as bletting which takes 2 to 3 weeks in storage. The fruit becomes soft, mushy brown, sweet and tasty with a flavor like cinnamon applesauce.

Medlars are a fruit that can be eaten fresh in the winter. Poking a hole in the fruit and sucking out the bletted (let's not say rotted) flesh spitting out the smooth seeds is one way to experience the unique taste of Medlar."
source: "Dave's Garden"

I for one have no desire to try a medlar.
Nicely composed photo. Reading your description, I tried to convince myself it sounded appetizing...but no. :)
October 27th, 2020  
Thanks for the photo and details.
October 27th, 2020  
@johnfalconer

You are not tempted to try a medlar, John?
October 27th, 2020  
@amyk

It would take a lot of conviction, yes! Straight off the tree, the fruit is as hard as nails....
October 27th, 2020  
Nice focus and dof Joan. Your description isn't convincing me to try one if I ever came across it.
October 27th, 2020  
I have never heard of them so more research on my part is called for. Nice image of this unique looking fruit.
October 27th, 2020  
Hmmm. I'm not convinced either, but it is a very interesting fruit!
October 27th, 2020  
My girls' adopted granny makes wonderful medlar jelly, but boy it's a smelly process,

BTW picked you up a black artist board when I was in Hobbycraft, need a place to meet to give it to you x
October 27th, 2020  
Wonderful details in this. I have not heard of this fruit.
October 27th, 2020  
Never heard of this Hazel. Super-crisp focus in this shot
October 27th, 2020  
Nice details and great info
October 27th, 2020  
@30pics4jackiesdiamond

Oh thanks - will think about a pick up! Does that medlar jelly taste nice?
October 27th, 2020  
@quietpurplehaze it's lovely with cheese
October 27th, 2020  
@30pics4jackiesdiamond

OK but I'm not entirely convinced as my mum used to make quince jelly which I did not like at all!!!!
October 27th, 2020  
Glad you explained that. I have never heard of them before. Love the details in the leaves.
October 27th, 2020  
Sounds delightful, think I will give it a miss, great explanation.
October 27th, 2020  
Bep
I know this fruit, Hazel. Its Dutch name is mispel (Mespilus germanica). I remember my mother's mispel jelly.
Nice capture.
October 27th, 2020  
Beautiful shot. It is also rare in our country. And the fruit are collected when it freezes well.
October 27th, 2020  
Interersting fruit beautifully captured Hazel:)
October 27th, 2020  
Interesting information Hazel and a lovely capture .
October 27th, 2020  
Beautiful and interesting!
October 27th, 2020  
Nice find and quite interesting to learn about
October 28th, 2020  
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