FORF #10 - St Radigund's Abbey by fbailey

FORF #10 - St Radigund's Abbey

A last minute phone shot for the theme of Architecture, Flash of Red February. It was bitterly cold and getting dark when I took this shot and sadly the gathering of rooks (or crows?) along the rooftops isn't visible but it added to the spooky feel when standing outside.

Background information copied from doverhistorian.com › 2013/09/14 › st-radegunds-abbey

"The Abbey of Saint Radegund is at the top of the Coombe Valley, at Poulton, on a minor road from Dover to Folkestone. Now a working farm, the Abbey gives its name, with a slightly different spelling, to a part of Dover – St Radigunds.

St Radegund, to whom the Abbey was dedicated, was a princess born in 518 AD. Her father, Berthaire, was the pagan King of Thuringia in Southern Germany but when she was about ten her country was invaded by the Franks. Radegund was taken prisoner by King Clothier (or Lothier in some accounts) and he decided that Radegund should be groomed for the role of a royal Christian wife. Radegund acquiesced and took her studies seriously.

When she grew up, not only was Radegund accomplished but also very beautiful and Clothier, a notorious womaniser, decided to make her his fifth wife. Radegund, by all accounts, accepted her position meekly but increasingly devoted herself to great charitable works. Notably, she founded a hospital for lepers and persons ‘afflicted with the most nauseous distempers’, nursing them herself. She was also very pious and it was reputed that during Lent, Radegund wore a shift of haircloth with iron chains and collars and even hot plates of iron under her robes. She also abstained from eating flesh, fish, eggs and fruit.

About six years after their marriage, Clothier had Radegund’s brother murdered and this was probably the last straw for the young queen. Albeit, instead of loudly protesting, she ‘quietly removed herself from Court’ and sought help of Bishop Medard of Noyon, who was later canonised. The Bishop conferred on her the veil, made her a deaconess and Radegund retired to a religious house at Poitiers, France.

Clothier, however, demanded Radegund’s return and was about to try force when Germain, the Bishop of Paris (again later canonised), persuaded Clothier to leave his wife alone. In 557 Radegund built the monastery of the Holy Cross at Poitiers for which, twelve years later, she obtained, from Emperor Justin I, a large fragment of the true cross-encased in rich reliquary. Radegund’s monastery, for both monks and nuns, became a centre of learning. Radegund died peacefully on 13 August 587 and was buried in the crypt at Poitiers..."
Wonderful leading line and composition...What an interesting history.
February 11th, 2020  
Love the road leading you there - fav!
February 11th, 2020  
Great pov and leading lines - leading to the beautiful ruin ! - fav
February 11th, 2020  
ooh nice shot
February 11th, 2020  
It looks wonderfully spooky in b&w even without being able to see the rooks :)
February 11th, 2020  
great in b&w!
February 11th, 2020  
Stunning image, a true tribute to such a brave woman. FAV!
February 11th, 2020  
fabulous old building
February 11th, 2020  
What a super building, and great shot of it too!
February 11th, 2020  
The composition is great it leads you right through the image.
February 11th, 2020  
bep
Beautiful B&W capture and very interesting history.
February 11th, 2020  
Great shot
February 11th, 2020  
Wonderful B&W!
February 11th, 2020  
nice mood
February 11th, 2020  
Fabulous capture
February 11th, 2020  
Would love to visit, and great information too.
February 11th, 2020  
Wonderfully composed with great leading lines.
February 11th, 2020  
Love the leading lines to this cool building!
February 11th, 2020  
Beautiful scene
February 11th, 2020  
How wonderful.
February 12th, 2020  
Incredibly old ruins, what's not to like?
February 12th, 2020  
Eerie and nice grunge feel
February 12th, 2020  
Great leading lines, info and composition. Fav!! 😀
February 12th, 2020  
Moody shot, I like it and your interesting commentary.
February 12th, 2020  
A wonderful capture.
February 12th, 2020  
Very interesting history about this building. Love the pov up the road.
February 13th, 2020  
Quite dramatic.
February 14th, 2020  
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