Stone and bricks

Last one of the trio of window shots from the old stone cottage. How on earth did the builders get those whacking great slabs of rock up there?
I love the pov and the shadows. This sort of building would keep us photographers entertained for hours (and then some, as we waited for 'better light'….) Fav
posted November 18th, 2018  
@dide You're absolutely right Dianne. Next time I go to my daughter's I'll get her to drop me down there and I'll ring her to come and get me when I'm done! My undercarriage doesn't cope with the hills any more.
posted November 18th, 2018  
Great pov and textures. I like it.
posted November 18th, 2018  
@golftragic Too bad there's a ditch in the way, or I'd come and join you!
posted November 18th, 2018  
I appreciate these old designs very much. Adjusting and adding these stones is a special skill. It is an immediate experience of the world, its properties. Every single stone has its meaning in a larger whole. Even in this state of ruin, his own dignity is palpable.whole.
posted November 18th, 2018  
Another beauty :)
posted November 18th, 2018  
Lovely!
posted November 18th, 2018  
Another lovely image :)
posted November 18th, 2018  
Great shot
posted November 18th, 2018  
It was so beautifully made (and, yes, how did they get them up there!) - even as a ruin it is still marvellous - in an ideal world there would be enough time and money to bring it back to its original condition.
posted November 18th, 2018  
I wonder that with the megalithic structures in the ancient times :)
posted November 18th, 2018  
Black and white really brings out the textures. I bet the stonemason got a hernia building this one. My ggg grandfather was a stonemason and died of a strangulated hernia, can't think why!
posted November 18th, 2018  
Great textures
posted November 19th, 2018  
I have a weak undercarriage too! Certainly could not be builder's mate if they were building this! Wonderful construction!
posted November 19th, 2018  
I like the structures in this composition, and the framing using the windows to frame the doors. Great textures as well.
posted November 19th, 2018  
@dide I'd like that very much!! Pity about that ditch.
posted November 19th, 2018  
@jerome I hadn't thought of the place in that light Jerome, wish I had your artistic eye. Thanks for your thoughtful comment.
posted November 19th, 2018  
posted November 19th, 2018  
@robz I wish!!!! Would love to do something like that, but our money tree is rather barren.
posted November 19th, 2018  
@hermann Yeah, good point Sally. Those big slabs weight a ton.
posted November 19th, 2018  
@onewing Interesting history there Babs. I'd love to know a bit about the history of this little cottage.
posted November 19th, 2018  
@jgpittenger thanks Jane.
posted November 19th, 2018  
@maggiemae Back in my youth maybe, definitely not now. Lugging in the supermarket shopping is about my limit now.
posted November 19th, 2018  
@taffy thank you Taffy, much appreciated.
posted November 19th, 2018  
What a great structure. As others have said you could spend hours photographing it as the light changed throughout the day. I've enjoyed the series. As for how they got those stones up there- they used pulleys and weights on wood built hoists. Since it was man-powered it probably took a good 6 or 7 men to maneuver it but they were able to do a lot more than we give them credit for.
posted November 19th, 2018  
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