Black Cat

Remembrance Day: Both my grandfathers fought in WW1, one was KIA in Flanders in 1917 without ever seeing his son, my father. The other was badly wounded. I have no photos though. So I've posted something from WW2 when my father served. The Black Cats, slow, lumbering flying-boats were used in the Pacific Theatre during WW2 for air-sea rescue and very risky secret operations inserting Allied personnel behind Japanese lines. Painted black for maximum night-time camouflage, they were sitting ducks for any enemy fighter plane. My father was in a Catalina squadron and was one of only three of the original intake to survive the war.
Wow what a story .. My FIL went off to WW2 and left wife and 2 year old daughter to run the farm .. when he returned at the end of war his daughter did not know him and took sometime to realize that this man was her Dad .. When we were down at the Chatham Island we saw a Sunderland flying boat and it is in the process of getting repaired in hope it will fly again ... they are huge... lets hope it gets up in the air again ..
posted November 11th, 2018  
What a scary time for your father and horrible to think that nearly all his mates from the same intake did not return.
posted November 11th, 2018  
@julzmaioro @dide War is such a bloody (literally) waste of life, money and effort in almost all cases. Sometimes I despair that we've learned nothing when I listen to people like Trump who seems bent on antagonising just about everyone else in the world. As for WW2 IMHO the ANZACS were conned by Dugout Dougie MacArthur and let down by the Dutch (who then owned Indonesia). My dad told me the Dutch Air Force would never attend an air-sea rescue because of the danger of landing on the water. He told me a great deal more too, but not for here. Fingers crossed for the Sunderland. There's a couple of Cats that have been restored, thank goodness.
posted November 11th, 2018  
So many memories for you Marnie - and so much sadness for your family. My Great Uncle also fought in new Guinea and, although he never said much, also had deeply ingrained mistrusts and dislikes for some other nationalities. I think nearly every family would have a family member who was lost or whose life was changed for the worse by either WW1 or WW2. And. as you say, modern man still doesn't seem to have learnt the lesson. 100 years ago and still so relevant.
posted November 11th, 2018  
excellent processing, nicely done
posted November 11th, 2018  
An amazing story Marnie. My dad served in the Air Force in Darwin and New Guinea but never really talked about it much. I have his photos but sadly only about 6 were written on to help identification. Terrific tribute for today.
posted November 11th, 2018  
What a fabulous shot and a moving story. fav.
posted November 11th, 2018  
Thanks for sharing your story Marnie. It would be wonderful if we could all live in peace and harmony, but first we need to get rid of egos and bigotry.
posted November 11th, 2018  
What an amazing story -thank you for your family’s sacrifice and service
posted November 11th, 2018  
Thank you for sharing your story Marnie, our forebears made such sacrifices :)
posted November 11th, 2018  
nice remembrance
posted November 11th, 2018  
Wow- your family history is amazing. You have given so much to not only your country but to the world.
posted November 11th, 2018  
Potent, heart rending remembrance
posted November 12th, 2018  
@robz I didn't realise it as a kid growing up, but so many, including my relatives were serious damaged in one way or another even if they hadn't been physically wounded. Neither my father nor my grandfather would allow the most innocuous toy gun anywhere near them. Water pistols were the limit. As for the hatred of certain nationalities, yep!!!!!! I knew several blokes who'd been POWs in SE Asia, one worked for my dad. My sisters are a lot younger than me and one was friendly with a couple of Japanese youngsters at school and wanted to bring them home to play. Dad just said 'I cannot have a Japanese person in this house!'. Nothing good comes from war.
posted November 12th, 2018  
@graemestevens Many thanks, kind sir.
posted November 12th, 2018  
@gilbertwood Oh wow, I know what you mean Denise. My dad served at Milne Bay (perhaps more) in PNG. Where was your dad?
posted November 12th, 2018  
@merrelyn I couldn't agree more, but add violence of any kind to that list.
posted November 12th, 2018  
@samae Thank you very much.
posted November 12th, 2018  
@777margo Thanks Margo, appreciated.
posted November 12th, 2018  
@hermann And some people still want to wage war as the answer to everything. I don't get it.
posted November 12th, 2018  
@olivetreeann Thank you very much Ann, I appreciate your recognition of that generation's sacrifices very much.
posted November 12th, 2018  
@jgpittenger Very much so, thank you Jane.
posted November 12th, 2018  
@golftragic Interesting - One photo has a Milne Bay sign in it!!
posted November 12th, 2018  
@golftragic All so true - and it is impossible to condemn the attitudes of the older generation - after what they went through....
posted November 12th, 2018  
Very interesting story. How life was not worth much at that time. They were all heroes. Well done.
posted November 12th, 2018  
@haskar Absolutely. And your country was right in the thick of things.
posted November 13th, 2018  
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