Black box country by golftragic

Black box country

With some Old-Man saltbush still flourishing. Saltbush is an important drought food for Merino sheep, but is now rarely seen in these parts due to over-grazing by sheep and kangaroos.
Sheep are easy to control but no so kangaroos! This looks so dry but is probably normal!
April 13th, 2019  
So, so dry. You have to wonder when areas such as these reach a stage where they can't recover....
April 13th, 2019  
A lovely composition of this dried up scene. When we drive through the countryside, it always amazes me to see sheep grazing on the dry earth! I often wonder what they find.
April 13th, 2019  
It looks quite sad at the moment, but I suppose when it does eventually rain it will all come back to life again.
April 13th, 2019  
Not a healthy looking place for the sheep!
April 13th, 2019  
It is interesting to see this, but it makes my heart ache.
April 13th, 2019  
Your photos are such poignant reminders of what poor shepherds we’ve been of Mother Earth
April 13th, 2019  
So sad reading the narrative -- the image is a powerful one.
April 13th, 2019  
Beautiful capture and lovely framing. And at the same time so poignant.
April 13th, 2019  
I like how you've framed this shot with the tree to the right. Some people resort to netting all around the bushes here so that the deer can't do what the kangaroos and sheep have done. Sometimes it works...
April 14th, 2019  
@maggiemae Yes, you're right. Dry is normal, but even so this is abnormally dry. I forgot to mention the thrice-cursed rabbits, of course.
April 14th, 2019  
@golftragic Oh, and the emus. Everything on foot and wing is moving south looking for water and food. Huge flocks of corellas and cockatoos wreak havoc too.
April 14th, 2019  
@robz Dry is the normal status quo, this is abnormally dry and with the whole climate change thing no-one really knows what lies in the future.
April 14th, 2019  
@ludwigsdiana As you'd well know, some breeds of sheep are great survivors, merino sheep in particular so far as Oz is concerned. They'll even eat clover burr off each others' fleece.
April 14th, 2019  
@onewing Yes, one would hope so Babs. But the whole climate change thing is very worrying, no-one knows what's likely to happen.
April 14th, 2019  
@gilbertwood Merinos are amazing survivors. Leroy has cut his sheep numbers in half so only running around 1500 currently.
April 14th, 2019  
@ethelperry I know exactly what you mean Ethel. Life's pretty darned tough up there currently. And not only there, of course.
April 14th, 2019  
@jgpittenger Yes, you're right Jane. This piece of ground is pretty much as it's always been, it's a very dry climate. Rabbits, an introduced species, have done terrible damage to inland Australia.
April 14th, 2019  
@taffy Thank you Taffy, I thought some idea of this story was worth telling to my 365 friends.
April 14th, 2019  
@haskar Thank you Haskar, I rather like that country, but do wish the weather would break and rain.
April 14th, 2019  
@olivetreeann I forgot to mention the thrice-cursed rabbits too. An introduced species, they've done untold and massive damage to inland Australia. Netting newly planted trees and home gardens is pretty common practice here too. Otherwise the rabbits would wipe them out. Sheep have only lower-jaw teeth and an upper hard gum-pad so can't eat right to the ground level of plants, whereas rabbits have top and bottom teeth and eat anything right to ground level and continue to do so.
April 14th, 2019  
Leave a Comment
Sign up for a free account or Sign in to post a comment.