More Poplars... by vignouse

More Poplars...

I was amazed at the interest in my yesterday's somewhat tongue-in-cheek image of local poplar trees - so here's a bit of back-story.

It became something of a fad 25 years ago or so to plant poor quality agricultural land with poplars as a commercial crop. The theory was that poplars are very quick growing, need no maintenance and can be densely planted... but no one had accounted for the 'mistletoe problem!

Once one tree has a mistletoe 'infection' it quickly spreads through the rest. Eventually the trunk and branches are weakened and subject to wind damage. The seeds are spread by birds who like to eat the white berries. The most common 'hosts' are apple, poplar and lime trees but also certain oaks. The Latin genus name for mistletoe is Phoradendron which means 'tree thief' - that says it all I guess.

The poplars in this image are about 3 km away from the ones I featured yesterday and you can see where some of the higher stems have already snapped off - these trees will be completely dead in a couple of years.

Inevitably, this is another image to view on black.
Does look great on black. Love the clouds
January 15th, 2020  
One man's treasure is another man's trash or in this case substitute enemy for trash
January 15th, 2020  
Fabulous b&w nature shot
January 16th, 2020  
Love the silhouettes against the sky's marbled pattern
January 16th, 2020  
These are quite lovely against that sky. Maybe someone should start a business selling mistletoe.
January 16th, 2020  
they are really quite lovely to look up through
January 16th, 2020  
@gardencat The tradition in France used to be to decorate with mistletoe on New Year's Eve but I haven't seen it done around us for several years.
January 16th, 2020  
Lovely shots - both yesterday and today. Are the poplars particularly targeted by the mistletoe then? I remember seeing lots of mistletoe on the trees by the Seine when we lived in the suburbs of Paris, but never paid particular attention to the types of trees infected by mistletoe. An interesting and curious relationship, as you rightly say.
January 16th, 2020  
They look mischievous, as if they'll resume play when you leave them in peace!
January 16th, 2020  
This photo has a darker aspect to it vs. yesterdays..quite fitting for the story.
January 16th, 2020  
Interesting info, fav
January 16th, 2020  
Lovely silhouettes against a dramatic sky. Fascinating background info too - fav!

Ian
January 16th, 2020  
Interesting story. I did not know about mistletoe.
January 16th, 2020  
Neat silhouettes.
January 16th, 2020  
Gosh, I wasn't aware that mistletoe was so hard on a tree.
January 17th, 2020  
Amazing. Farmers take warning
January 17th, 2020  
Beautiful picture- the sky is very dramatic!
January 17th, 2020  
Dramatic is putting it mildly :-)
January 17th, 2020  
Leave a Comment
Sign up for a free account or Sign in to post a comment.