The best article on 'editing' you will ever read.

posted May 7th, 2012
Well, today, at least. :)

erickimphotography.com/blog/2012/03/15-tips-how-street-photographers-can-better-edit-their-work

Not just for street photographers - the information here will work for pretty much anyone.

SOMETHING TO KEEP IN MIND:
"When I refer to “editing“, I am referring to the act of choosing your best images, rather than “post-processing”. However nowadays when most photographers refer to “editing” their work, you can almost determine with 99% accuracy that they mean “post-processing” their work. Due to this confusion and interchanging use of the word “editing” – the true art of editing, or choosing your best work, is a lost cause." ~ from the article.

In other words, he is NOT talking about Photoshop, post-processing, PickNick, PicAviary, MS Paint, what-have-you.

Also, the following quote probably just changed my life:

"You are what you eat. If you only look at mediocre photographs, you can only aspire to take mediocre photographs at best." ~ Eric Kim
posted May 7th, 2012
@beautifulthing Error 500 - Internal server error

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Please try again later.

You Broke Eric Kims Website :P

Also for anyone taking part in the Street Photography Now challenge then Eric Kim is one of my favourite Street Photogers and his website / blog is well worth following
posted May 7th, 2012
@38mm Try it now. I feexed it.
posted May 7th, 2012
Ooo I like the in-person critique idea....but who the hell is going to do that for me? :(
posted May 7th, 2012
@sdpace Dunno, but I would be happy for you to be mine. I'm calling dibs on you before someone else does :)
posted May 7th, 2012
@38mm that's a helluva long drive, yo. :)
posted May 7th, 2012
@sdpace Ah, I assumed you meant in-person but on this site if that makes sense. Even though that's not in-person, I'll shut up now :)
posted May 7th, 2012
Taxi for one
posted May 7th, 2012
@sdpace @38mm Um, I think the BEE EFF EFF gets to call dibs first. #justsaying

I really really liked the idea of holding onto images and not dumping everything that's remotely serviceable online, which is definitely a habit of mine when shooting film. Shawn Hoke (yes, I'm on about Shawn Hoke again) posts maybe three shots a week or so, if that. I'm not sure how long he holds onto rolls before he develops them, though.

I've gotten into the habit of holding onto a roll of film until I forget what's on it, and only THEN taking it to get developed. That helps. I'm not sure what the digital equivalent of that would be - perhaps not going through your images until the card is full? No idea.

posted May 8th, 2012
@beautifulthing Yeah I kinda go upload crazy, I have been thinking about a second Flickr account just for the good stuff. Plus if you don't upgrade it you will be limited as well
posted May 8th, 2012
Less is more. Don't do 365 :)

Great article.
posted May 8th, 2012
@dieter The more I think about it, the more I am totally and completely inclined to agree. I'm thinking it's time to rethink what I'm doing here, for sure. :)
posted May 8th, 2012
@beautifulthing Thanks for posting this! He's very right in the distancing yourself from your photos to help weed out the bad ones. I know I need to do that more often. Im going to try and actually do some stuff from this article. Thank you!
posted May 8th, 2012
@katiebrenkert You are welcome! It's definitely, DEFINITELY food for thought. I've already been working on clearing some things out of my Flickr this afternoon.
posted May 8th, 2012
loved this article! thanks for sharing!
posted May 8th, 2012
Fantastic article. I probably should practise more of it. Most photos i upload here do not please me as much. My own portfolio (when i finally organize it) should have around 20-30 photos. Nothing in comparison to the more than a hundred i already posted here. And much others than didn't even came to be posted... I took more than 10 thousand pictures, and yet, only a few, 20 or so i really really like.
posted May 8th, 2012
@beautifulthing Great article. My new motto: "Only post your best shots".
posted May 8th, 2012
@gabrielklee That sounds like a good balance though! I just finished going through my Flickr - I deleted over 600 images. Unreal. And I probably could have deleted more.

I'm eventually going to do a portfolio site and I'm shooting for only 30-40 there.
posted May 8th, 2012
thank you so much for posting this link, Shelly...
posted May 8th, 2012
Interesting article. I guess it all depends on your goals and your purpose--I am trying to have fun, which means no rules and no pressure. If someone was trying to shoot professionally they would need to evaluate their actions more IMO. Also I think it's great that so many people are loading photos all over the internet, it's not an exclusive club--it's a way for people to share and communicate.
posted May 8th, 2012
This is a really interesting article. Lots to think about. Thanks for posting.
posted May 8th, 2012
Good stuff. "Wait a certain period of time before you upload" - that is something I should do more. It has been such an eye-opener as I've gone through my older shots. I've discarded really good pictures, uploaded horrible ones and done some hideous processing to them... and then there are a couple of pictures which still make me happy, just the way they are.

What I've been trying to do lately, is to edit while shooting. I shoot shitloads of "OK" pictures, not crap but nothing special either. So, before pressing the shutter, I really try to think "does this work, have I done this already..." . I don't feel like I have missed a single good shot, but I know I have saved a lot of time because I don't have to go through hundreds of mundane pictures.
posted May 8th, 2012
@janmaki You should have seen some of the HORRIBLE shots that I just cleaned out of my Flickr - really, really bad.

That editing while shooting is a good idea - I've been trying to do that too, especially with film, since I have more limited shots. Ken Rockwell has a GREAT article about that: http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/fart.htm
posted May 8th, 2012
Great article Shelly! God, I love so many points he made in it and agree totally with everything. Taking photos everyday is good... we all know that to be a truth. But you don't have to show all of them. Many times I catch myself thinking "would I hang that up on my wall... would I include it in a book?" which is the same thing he's saying about including it in an exhibition. That is a real stopper! And looking at great photography is another I agree with. There are times when I feel like I'm looking at too much crap. And the one about trying to be original... not copying others work... holds a dear place in my heart. Great article!
posted May 8th, 2012
How do I find you on Flickr? Now I'm curious :)
posted May 8th, 2012
@aspada @beautifulthing also since the article mentions the 365 project... I think that 365 and a portfolio site are different things. 365 is a community that make you learn and photograph more (thus learn more). With that in mind, photographing everyday, you can manage to do a great portfolio. And when you do, edit yourself ruthlessly.
posted May 8th, 2012
@aspada Thanks! The link is in my profile. :)
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