doe a deer - Camera Settings Challenge

Learning 5.6 aperture
Beautiful capture.
posted May 7th, 2012  
wow..
posted May 7th, 2012  
Very nice capture
posted May 7th, 2012  
Beautiful
posted May 7th, 2012  
nice capture
posted May 7th, 2012  
Great shot, Kathy! Love how she us framed! Very impressive!
posted May 7th, 2012  
Much more appealing to the eye than "Doh!" a Homer. Very nice capture.
posted May 7th, 2012  
@robv LOL - but not as appealing as the dough boy
posted May 7th, 2012  
Cool capture .. Lovely creatures!
posted May 7th, 2012  
Pillsbury dough boy FTW! Poppin fresh, I'm partial to the orange and cinnamon rolls in the deli case. Those and a hot cup of coffee on a cold winter morning, yum. Happy Monday, if those words aren't mutually exclusive.
posted May 7th, 2012  
You, lucky gal! Great capture of this doe!
posted May 7th, 2012  
Hooray, this is great!
posted May 7th, 2012  
lovely - and wonderful surroundings.
posted May 7th, 2012  
this is awesome!!!
posted May 7th, 2012  
csc-1

Can I suggest that for this shot you should use a f stop of something like f11. This will ensure that the entire images is in focus at f5.6 you have the risk of only part of the image being in focus.

The being of f5.8 is you have more light coming in.
posted May 7th, 2012  
@agima thank you so much for that suggestion! I really appreciate if very much! I am trying to understand what aperture settings do & how they effect the shot and that is extremely helpful!
posted May 7th, 2012  
A gorgeous capture...
posted May 7th, 2012  
Tricky choosing bewtween f11 and f5.6. The latter is best for moving objects. You can always take 2 shots on each.
posted May 7th, 2012  
very envious of this shot, what a lovely capture
posted May 7th, 2012  
Beautiful capture
@agima Just a question about the f11, would this be too dark for this shot as it is already in the shade? And what shutter speed would you use? Sorry that was two, trying to get the handle on this as well, thanks
posted May 7th, 2012  
@wenbow Yes you are correct if you kept the same Ido it would be two stops darker. To get around this you would multiple your iso by four. Now having said that it is currently on io 1600 so I would Suggest that is a far as you would want o go on this camera.

The trade off is you stop your lens down to f2.8 and crop in tight so it's more about the deer and not an environment shot with the foreground....
posted May 7th, 2012  
@agima I noticed the high ISO, I usually don't change the ISO past 100 if I don't need to. But I get changing the lens down, have been playing round with that a bit. Gets a bit confusing as there are options to any shot but it's getting the right one & downloading it into my brain. Thank you!!!!!
posted May 7th, 2012  
@agima @wenbow Thank you - I have so much to learn on these settings. It was actually pretty shady in this section - I saw a movement and tried to sneak inside the woods off the path. It was very shady and for the most part a cloudy day. I was concentrating on my f5.6 shots more than anything and hoped.
posted May 7th, 2012  
@myhrhelper Thanks for setting this challenge up, I am yet to do my f5.6 shot yet. Hope you don't mind me asking questions here, loving that there is people here who can help us out. You achieved a great shot, my first attempt at this sort of shot would have been in total darkness
posted May 7th, 2012  
Your welcome - I wanted to learn how to use the settings and I thought there must be others like me out there and perhaps we can learn from the experts. So glad they are will ing to help!
Wendy I am totally learning this and I haven't been doing the ISO since I'm waiting for a new challenge to learn that. Never did aperture before this challenge. I have been putting my camera of A where I can set the
aperture but the camera does everything else automatic. Especially since I just got this camera and there are a lot of basic functions I knew how to do on my point & shoot that I dont' know where they are yet on this camera. I think my camera read that it was too dark and opened the IS) (something I did adjust on my point n shoot). @wenbow
posted May 8th, 2012  
@myhrhelper Yes, that is right the camera would have picked up the darkness & set that ISO. That's part of the reason I switched to manual mode so I could learn for myself what settings to use on different shots. It is just confusing what you have to think about to getting the right light in the image & which setting number to use. So many combinations, it will great when we hit ISO in the challenge
posted May 8th, 2012  
Deer beautiful
posted May 8th, 2012  
@myhrhelper @wenbow Can I suggest that you keep your camera in aperture priority mode and not worry about manual mode at the moment.

I use Aperture priority mode 90% of the time and only adjust the exposure using the exposure compensation. This will then change the shutter speed and ISO for you. I will sometimes lock in a ISO so the camera will only adjust the shutter for me.
posted May 8th, 2012  
Here is a DOF calculator to get a feel for the effect of aperture, distance to subject from the focal plane, sensor size and focal length. http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html
With your camera and the focal length, aperture you used and a guess of 50 feet to the doe that would yield DOF of 4 feet or so.
posted May 8th, 2012  
Kathy, this is great.
posted May 8th, 2012  
@agima Thanks will give it a go
posted May 8th, 2012  
Fab capture! I love the way she is just looking right at you! :)
posted May 8th, 2012  
Great capture!
posted May 8th, 2012  
Nicely done Kathy
posted May 8th, 2012  
Beautiful capture
posted May 8th, 2012  
Awesome capture!
posted May 8th, 2012  
Fabulous
posted May 8th, 2012  
A lovely capture of a pretty deer!
posted May 8th, 2012  
Moving to f.11 would require a shutter speed of about 1/10th sec. which should still be adequate with that lens.
It won't allow in any more or less light and your ISO will remain unchanged.
It will, however alter the DoF.
Personally, I would probably have gone with something like f.8 @ ISO 800 which should hopefully allow a useable shutter speed, depending, of course, on the light available.
In this case, not much, by the look of it!
I use Aperture almost all of the time, ISO set at 200 to start with, which I change as necessary, depending upon what shutter speed the camera offers me, although I seldom use higher settings than 800 because of the potential for noise.
Ideally, you would keep the ISO as low as possible and use the aperture and shutter speeds to correctly expose the shot.
Look at the histogram after each shot. That will tell you whether you're over or under exposing.
Brendan says above that he makes adjustments using exposure compensation to change the shutter speed and ISO. I've never heard of exposure compensation altering ISO and I only use it to manually fine tune shots.
Doesn't mean it doesn't work, I suppose, it's just not something I've ever come across.
Presumably, you took this as a Jpeg?
If you'd shot it in RAW, you'd have been able to claw back an awful lot of detail in the dark areas. RAW really is the way to go, provided you have the software to deal with it.
Hope this helps.

Jester.
posted May 8th, 2012  
Beautiful capture!
posted May 8th, 2012  
great capture! It reminds me of the movie Bambi when they are peeking out of the dark woods early in the morning.
posted May 9th, 2012  
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