Lendal Bridge, York by fishers

Lendal Bridge, York

Taken on a grey day at the end of October, this is one of three road bridges over the River Ouse in the centre of York.

The bridge replaced an earlier ferry service, which had operated from Barker Tower, on the south-west bank (right in this shot), to Lendal Tower (left). The advent of the railways in York in the first half of the nineteenth century made the ferry service busier than ever with passengers wanting to cross the river going to and from York’s original railway station in Tanner Row.

A bridge to replace the Lendal ferry service was first suggested in 1838 but responsibility for its construction became a point of controversy between the Corporation of York and the railway companies. After much debate, the Lendal Bridge and York Improvement Act was finally passed in 1860 and the foundation stone of the original bridge, designed by William Dredge, was laid later that year. Then disaster struck. In 1861 the original bridge collapsed during construction, killing five men.

The bridge was redesigned and finally opened in 1863. The new architect, brought in after the failed first attempt, was Thomas Page, who also designed Skeldergate Bridge in York and Westminster Bridge in London.

Lendal Bridge is an iron bridge with details in the Gothic style popular in Victorian England. The ornate parapet of the bridge features the white rose of York, the crossed keys of the Diocese of York and the lions of England. Additional ironwork includes York’s coat of arms and the initials V & A, representing Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

The new bridge put the ferryman out of business. Records show that he received compensation of 15 pounds and a horse and cart.

A toll was charged to cross the new bridge to help pay for its construction. The charge was half a penny for foot passengers, a penny for animals and twopence for horse-drawn vehicles. The two small toll-houses still exist and now housing cafés. The last toll was charged in 1894.

The bridge was also the location of a recent tragedy. On the day this shot was taken, a young woman fell from the bridge and a massive rescue operation was launched to find her but without success (see http://365project.org/fishers/365/2020-11-01 ). Yesterday the body of a young woman was found at Naburn Lock, some miles downstream from the city. Although she has not yet been formally identified, it is highly likely that it is the person who fell from this bridge a month ago.

Ian
lovely reflections
November 27th, 2020  
Nice reflections and history
November 27th, 2020  
Very nice shot
November 27th, 2020  
Interesting history and great reflections
November 27th, 2020  
A lovely composition and great reflections.Fav🙂
November 27th, 2020  
Super bright image for a dark day
November 27th, 2020  
A fantastic shot of this bridge and interesting information to go with it. I walked across this when me and my husband travelled to York on a steam train a few years ago. Sad about the body found in the river
November 27th, 2020  
wow! Amazing composition and reflections
fav
interesting history, sad to hear about the tragic recently
November 27th, 2020  
Great capture of the river , beautiful bridge and town . Fav.
November 27th, 2020  
Super reflections and I love the boats through the arch, fav.
November 27th, 2020  
Wonderful reflections
November 28th, 2020  
I like the angle of your shot to show the details of the bridgework and the lovely reflection on the water. Enjoyed very much reading your script but very sad with the story of the lady.
November 28th, 2020  
Lovely pic!
November 28th, 2020  
@pdulis @craftymeg @bkbinthecity @thistle01 @carolmw @busylady @rosiekind @ninaganci @pyrrhula @pattyblue @kjarn @sangwann @photographycrazy

Thank you all for your lovely comments and favs, they are very much appreciated.

The river looks very smooth and tranquil in this shot, but the river level was rising and it was quite fast flowing.

Ian
November 28th, 2020  
@rosiekind

I wonder if I was at York railway station to photograph the steam train that you arrived on? I do like to get shots of steam trains, and usually in normal times there are quite a few for me to see and capture.

Ian
November 28th, 2020  
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